No More Silence

No More Silence is the English translation of the popular Moroccan rapper El Haqed’s controversial song. The song (lyrics which can be viewed below) which openly encourages Moroccans to stand up for their rights against the government and stay silent no longer is just one of many anthems that has been inspired by the February 20th movement for Democracy.

NO MORE SILENCE

CHORUS (Jihane)
If the people want life,
then they’ll stand up to defend their rights. No more silence!
They exploit our wealth and leave the crumbs for us
while so many freedom fighters died on our behalf.

L7a9ed:
This is for all Moroccans.
To the free and to those who refuse to be humiliated.
To those living in misery and injustice.

CHORUS (Jihane)
If the people want life,
then they’ll stand up to defend their rights. No more silence!
They exploit our wealth and leave the crumbs for us
while so many freedom fighters died on our behalf.

L7a9ed:
Wake up! Look at the Egyptian people
and the people of Tunisia. They’re lying to you, those who say,
« Morocco, you’re an exception. » Okay, living is a luxury.
Their political brainwashing is calculated.
Debauchery and reality television, among other things, are there to distract us.
We have no choice but to fight for our rights.
Silence won’t benefit us. I am the child of the people and I’m not scared!

Those who suffered in silence and were dragged
through the streets are fed up with going around in circles
while our brother [the king] convenes his team to amend the constitution.
There’s something to go crazy over! Do they want us
to take up arms to seize our rights?
It’s for me to choose whom I want to sanctify.
And if you understand us, come live with us.
« God, the Homeland, and Freedom » [NOT “God, the Homeland, and the King”]

CHORUS (Jihane)
If the people want life,
then they’ll stand up to defend their rights. No more silence!
They exploit our wealth and leave the crumbs for us
while so many freedom fighters died on our behalf.

L7a9ed:
It’s a problem. It’s a problem. We must reformulate the equation.
We want a leader whom we can hold to account
and not an infallible, sanctified entity.
We are told: they’ll make you disappear.
I shout it loud and clear: they’ll make me disappear.
Give me my rights or give me death.

You speculate on our banks.
You sell us at auctions and you did it to us again and again.
You share in the spoils and you kiss [the king’s] hand.
Long live my father [the king],
He seized our wealth
and as long as I’ve lived, his children [the people] have not inherited it.

You erased our history and you want to bury it with
sequins and glitter again.
Our king is kind and generous to us,
but to whom is he truly generous? Most of our budget
is spent on him and his palace entourage.

CHORUS (Jihane)
If the people want life,
then they’ll stand up to defend their rights. No more silence!
They exploit our wealth and leave the crumbs for us
while so many freedom fighters died on our behalf.

Translated by Revolutionary Arab Rap

El Haqed whos real name is Mouad Belrhouat often preforms his songs at rallies for the February 20th movement but made headlines last January when he was arrested for alleged assault and denied bail while awaiting trial. The New York Times had a great article on why his arrest was so controversial and relates directly to the February 20th movement.

Mouad Belrhouat’s arrest shows something much bigger going on in Morocco. The constitutional reforms put in place by King Muhammad VI are not turning out to be what people thought they were when they voted for them. The constitutional reforms seem like more of a ploy to distract the Moroccan people than an actual attempt at making changes within the government. It has become clear over the past year that the few changes that were made are not going to be enough to satisfy the Moroccan people. Through events like Mr. Belrhouat’s arrest you can see that the government is not giving the Moroccan people the rights they deserve.

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